Prime paid pensioners see 9% annual earnings progress



 

The highest 20% finest paid pensioners noticed their incomes rise by 9% yearly – equal to £2,496 yearly – over the last decade as much as 2022/23, in keeping with new evaluation.

Nevertheless, whereas one of the best paid pensioners did effectively, single pensioners on the backside of the pile noticed only a 2% annual improve – equal to solely £1 every week for some.

Unbiased consultancy Broadstone says its evaluation of the DWP’s Pensioner Revenue Sequence discovered a “rising earnings hole” between the poorest and richest pensioners.

The analysis revealed that single pensioner incomes within the backside 20% grew by solely 2% earlier than housing prices between 2010/11-2011/12 and 2020/21-2022/23, a mean improve of simply £208 a yr.

In marked distinction, these within the prime 20% loved annual earnings progress over the identical interval of 9%, equal to £2,496 yearly – a further £2,288 greater than these with the bottom incomes.

Broadstone mentioned the distinction was much more marked after housing prices, with single pensioners within the backside earnings quintile seeing their earnings improve by simply £1 every week over the previous decade. These within the prime quintile recorded earnings progress of £55 every week, or £2,860 a yr.

A single pensioner within the backside 20% noticed 88% of their gross earnings earlier than housing prices supplied by the State Pension and advantages – a slight improve from 87% a decade earlier. Broadstone says this implies they entered retirement with little in the best way of pensions or different financial savings.

Damon Hopkins, head of DC Office Financial savings at Broadstone, mentioned: “These figures present that the hole between the ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’ in retirement has widened sharply.

“Single pensioners already face important earnings pressures, particularly as they have to pay payments by way of a single earnings, however they’ve barely seen any improve of their earnings over the previous 10 years.”




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